Dilly Bread

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This recipe comes from my grandmother. It seems that every woman of her generation had a recipe for dilly bread. I had to do some rewriting on this for clarity, but I did not alter the ingredients or preparation method. Baking is a tricky thing, and I am reluctant to tamper with a time-tested process.

When I went shopping for the required ingredients, I discovered that very few places carry dill seed. Everyone has dill weed on the shelves, but dill seed is quite uncommon. For those who are having trouble locating this ingredient, try Whole Foods.

I am usually a stickler for placing oven preheating directions at the very beginning of a recipe. In this case, that would be a waste of energy, because the bread dough has to rise for quite a while. Some modern ovens can successfully heat in 10-15 minutes; I have an older oven that takes about 30 minutes to reach a desired temperature. I suggest preheating your oven before the second rising, as this will give it plenty of time to heat without overdoing it.

This bread is quite tasty served on the side of almost any meal. I was hungry when I made this, so I ended up slicing some of it laterally and making sandwiches with smoked ham and provolone. Whether you choose to get creative with it or simply serve it warm out of the oven with butter, dilly bread is not to be missed.

Ingredients:

  • 1 packet dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 cup cottage cheese, creamed
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh onion
  • 1 tablespoon butter, softened
  • 2 teaspoons dill seed
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 egg
  • 2 1/4 cups white flour

Directions:

3-mix_yeast

In a small bowl, combine the yeast and warm water.

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In a large bowl, combine the cottage cheese, sugar, onion, butter, dill seed, salt, baking soda, egg, and flour.

Allow the flour mixture to come to room temperature; the original recipe suggests placing it on top of the stove.

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Add the yeast mixture to the flour mixture, and mix until thoroughly combined.

6-dough

The result should be a stiff dough.

Cover the dough, and place it in a warm location.

Allow the dough to rise until double (about 1 hour).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Stir down the dough, and place it in a well-buttered 2-quart casserole dish.

Return the dough to the warm location, and allow it to rise again for 30-40 minutes.

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Bake for 40-50 minutes, or until the crust is a dark brown color.

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After removing the bread from the oven, brush the crust with melted butter and sprinkle with salt.

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3 thoughts on “Dilly Bread

  1. I love Dilly Bread with a passion! This is the first time I’ve seen a picture of it as a square loaf, and it looks VERY appetizing – also easier to slice for sandwiches, etc. I used to make “Dilly Muffins” for Easter Dinner – dill being so “springy” – and thereby gleaned a much higher crust-to-bread ratio. Oh, how I love that crust! (oink) I’m going to make some of this soon, and use my coarse Kosher salt on top. And it will be square. Thank you, Ms. Kollision, for yet another fantastic “receet”!

    1. Heh :) Well, the recipe called for a 2-quart baking dish, and the only one that I own is square, so…. if the bread fits, bake it? It really does slice well for sandwiches in that format, and said sandwiches made an excellent dinner.

      Love the idea of muffins! I might even take that a step further and make “Dilly Muffin Pockets” by placing ham and cheese in the center of the muffin before baking! Hmm, I think I now have another project to add to the list. :)

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